FINGER & WRIST STABILIZATION EXERCISES

Your body should be in balance, everybody knows that. Through one-sided strain and one-sided training routines, we tend to strengthen one side of the body stronger than the other. For example, if we use the wrist and forearm in breaking, we have to constantly push against the floor to get the power we need to move.

This example of one-sided loading leads to strong forearm flexors due to constant pressing against the ground and weak forearm extensors as antagonists. In addition, the extensors also play an important key role in stabilizing the wrist.Therefore, it is important to establish a balance in the joints through compensatory exercises.

 

EXERCISES 1: FINGER STABILISATION

Place a strong rubber band over all fingertips. The wrist remains in a neutral position throughout the exercise. Now open your fingers and keep each finger slightly flexed. If you can’t keep your fingers flexed, this means that you have weak extensor muscles and/or a poor muscle control of the extensors and therefore a weak stabilization of the fingers and wrist.

 

EXERCISE 2: WRIST FLEXION-EXTENSION WITH STABILIZED FINGERS

If you have managed to stabilize your fingers in the static position, you can continue with this exercise. Now you have to hold the stabilized finger position during the entire exercise and bend and extend your wrist at the same time.

Make sure that your fingers remain stable during the entire movement of the wrist. If this is not possible, return to the static exercise 1.

Do you feel the trembling of the extensors? This is a sign of your body that you have weak stabilisation of the fingers or weak extensor muscles.

 

EXERCISE 3: WRIST ULNAR- / RADIALDUCTION WITH STABILIZED FINGERS

In this exercise the fingers remain stable and the wrist is in a neutral position as in exercise 1. This time the wrist is moved from one side to the other without moving the forearm. Purely from the anatomy point of view, there is not much movement to the sides, especially on the thumb side.
A variation of this exercise is to make an eight with the wrist while the forearm does not move.

 

EXERCISE 4: WRIST EXTENSION WITH STABILIZED FINGER EXTENSION

This is the most difficult exercise in which the wrist and finger extensors are trained throughout the entire muscle movement. The starting position is a bent wrist with the fingertips touching each other (umbral handle). Firstly, the fingers are opened until they are in the slightly bent stabilization position. While the fingers are being opened, the wrist is extended at the same time.

This exercise should be done slowly. Make sure that you always have slightly flexed finger joints like in exercise 1.

 

HOW OFTEN SHOULD THESE EXERCISES BE DONE?

Choose one of these exercises and try to do about 10-15 repetitions and 3 series.

Always make sure to keep your fingers stable! This leads to a good feedback mechanism for self-regulation. If you can’t stabilize your fingers, do Exercise 1 or Exercise 2.

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO WRONG?

As already described, the extensors are often weak. Therefore, do not exaggerate these exercises especially at the beginning.

If your wrist is already irritated or has an inflammation, then rest first, let your body heal. It is important that you do not feel any pain during the exercises!

 

SOME USEFUL TIPS

A good way to evaluate your own progress is to write down what kind of movement causes wrist pain in training or after what time your wrist begins to hurt in training. After a few weeks you can evaluate the same properties and compare them with the first ones.

All in all, this is only one step on the way to a balanced, stable wrist. There are many other things you can do, such as stretching and resting.

 

Another article about the wrist concerning injury prevention, cause of injury and physiotherapeutic advice is here: THE BREAKER’S WRIST

Also check out the Urban Dance Health tutorial about THE BREAKER’S WRIST and learn:

  • How to make auto-tractions to your wrist joint
  • How to strengthen your wrist and forearm muscles
  • How to stretch your wrist and forearm muscles safely and effectively
  • How to put your hand to the floor while doing Footworks with a stable thumb
  • How to strengthen your fingers

 

 

REFERENCES:

Bradshaw, Elizabeth / Hume, Patria (2012). Biomechanical approaches to identify and quantify injury mechanisms and risk factors in women’s artistic gymnastics. In: Sports Biomechanics, 3/11/2012, pg. 324–341.
PMID: 23072044

Lindner SM. Injury Prevention oft he Breakdancer’s Wrist. Master thesis, University of Barcelona. 2014

Singletary, Shannon / Geissler, William (2009). Bracing and Rehabilitation for Wrist and Hand Injuries in Collegiate Athletes. In: Hand Clinics, 25/2009, pg. 443–448.
PMID: 19643343

 


Author:

 

JACOB WICK

Jacob ‚Jacker‘ Wick started breaking at the age of twelve in 2001. Today Jacker is training regularly as a dancer and works as a physiotherapist in the physiotherapeutic clinic Thera-Well in Vienna, Austria. Since 2017, he forms part of the Urban Dance Health team.

Get Jacker’s full CV here.

 

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